Speakers and Workshops

Keynote Speakers


Sunday

Reconceptualizing Helping & Healing: Letting Love and Neuroscience Guide our Way

with Kristie Brandt, NP, CNM, MSN, DNP – Kristie Brandt, Bio

This Keynote Address is designed for providers of all disciplines and roles who work with children and/or parents who have experienced trauma or other adversity from birth through age five. The content will focus on the neurobiological changes, including those within the Stress Response Systems, that impact all aspects of development, functioning, health, well-being, and healing.

Monday 

“The Journey to Joy”: Moments and Minutes of Caring Connection

with Cassandra Joubert, ScD – Cassandra Joubert, Bio

This keynote details an African American family’s journey through multiple systems of care, seeking help for a child with developmental challenges amidst the backdrop of cultural differences and racial trauma.  The session describes how caring connections with community providers along the way created success for the child and the family.

 

Tuesday 

 All Relationships Matter: Reflections on Infant Mental Health Principles and Practices

with Deborah Weatherston, PhD, IMH-E®  – Deborah J. Weatherston, Bio

“What about the baby?” asked Selma Fraiberg.  Those in the field of infant mental health – professionals in a variety of settings who represent many disciplines, research faculty, administrators, and policy makers – will recognize this question as fundamental to their work.  The presenter will offer reflections about the origins of IMH principles and practice and the centrality of relationship.   In addition, she will talk about her work within the field of infant mental health and her journey, personal and professional.  She will draw on her own experiences and share what babies, families, and professional have taught her while working beside them over many years.


Workshop Schedule and Descriptions

This year, the conference has a wide variety of great workshops for each breakout session.  With over 30 workshops to choose from, we promise that you will walk away from this Conference informed, rejuvenated & excited about your work with 0 – 6 year olds and their families.

Click to download & print if preferred: Workshop Schedule & Descriptions

Click to jump to each day’s workshops:

•  Sunday

•  Monday – morning sessions

•  Monday – afternoon sessions

•  Tuesday – morning sessions

•  Tuesday – afternoon sessions

Sunday, May 5, 2019 (A1 – A7)    •    3:30 pm – 5:00 pm

A1 Letting Love and Neuroscience Guide our Way – a deep dive into practices and principles

Kristie Brandt, NP, CNM, MSN, DNP (Keynote Speaker)

This workshop is designed for providers of all disciplines and roles who work with children and/or parents who have experienced trauma or other adversity from birth through age five. The content will focus on the neurobiological changes, including those within the Stress Response Systems, that impact all aspects of development, functioning, health, well-being, and healing.

 Levels: All
Format: Interactive, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Attachment, Separation, Trauma, Grief & Loss; Infant/Young Child Development & Behavior

A2 Community and university connections to strengthen infant mental health student clinical and reflective competencies in the classroom

Carla Barron, MSW, IMH-E® (IV), Karol Wilson, MSW, IMH-E® (IV), Amber Donahue, MSW, IMH-E® (II), Ann Stacks, PhD, IMH-E® (IV), and Carolyn Dayton, MSW, PhD, IMH-E® (IV)

This workshop describes a university-based Infant Mental Health (IMH) clinical training program’s collaborative approach to address the learning needs of IMH students.  Features of our university-community partnership include reflective practices in the classroom that connect to work in the community, documentation of professional growth across skills essential to IMH intervention, and reciprocal relationships between university faculty and agency staff.  This approach to clinical and educational preparation is beneficial in preparing students who enter the workforce as IMH home-based clinicians.  We will describe our collaborative approach, provide evidence of student growth, and present ways this training perspective supports the current work of an early career IMH home visitor.

Levels: All
Format: Case presentation, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Professional/Personal Development

A3 Created for Connection: Building and Sustaining Relationships that Heal

Amber Hartman, MSW, IMH-E® (III) and Pamela Crljenica, MSW, IMH-E® (III)

This process oriented workshop is designed to introduce IMH practitioners to concepts and techniques from EMDR that call upon our innate capacity to connect and can be used immediately in relationship-based practice. A key focus will be the unique perspective EMDR offers in support of the ability to develop and sustain reflective capacity. Compelling case examples will illustrate how integrating this perspective can dramatically transform IMH practitioners’ work. Participants will reflect upon their ability to embody openness and trust in this relational process to further connection to themselves, and the infants, young children, families, and supervisees they support.

Levels: Introductory Level (Infant Family Associate & Infant Family Specialist)
Intermediate Level (Infant Family Specialist & Infant Mental Health Specialist)
Advanced Level (Infant Mental Health Specialist & Infant Mental Health Mentor)
Format: Interactive,  Case presentation, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Psychotherapeutic & Behavioral Theories of Change; Attachment, Separation, Trauma, Grief & Loss 

A4 Intersubjectivity and Reflective Supervision/Consultation: Applying Theory to Relationship-Based Practice

Sarah Shea, MSW, PhD, IMH-E® (IV) and Kathleen Baltman, MA, IMH-E® (IV)

This workshop will provide an overview of the psychodynamic theories of intersubjectivity that recognize the multiple contributions of both therapist and client in any given interaction and the ways in which each actor contributes to the creation of a new relational experience.  The workshop will explicitly connect intersubjectivity to reflective supervision/consultation and provide participants with opportunities to engage in discussion around the application of this theoretical construct to reflective supervision vignettes.

 Levels: Advanced Level (Infant Mental Health Specialist & Infant Mental Health Mentor)
Format: Interactive, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Reflective Supervision

A5 Using Play To Heal The Relationship In Parent-Preschool Dyadic Therapy: Using ‘Pathway To Play And Healing’

Vickie Novell, MSW, IMH-E® (IV)

The ‘Pathway to Play and Healing’, an intervention matrix, supports the dyadic IMH work with preschoolers and their families. This tool explores a preschool child’s developmental domains, attachment styles, and communication and play skills, while also assessing parental domains, internal working models, and, most importantly, levels of regulation. Using the play domain as an intervention, the matrix provides guidance for balancing the child’s and parent’s therapeutic needs, and support the clinician and supervisor to identify ports of entry, areas of growth, and reflection. Through case study and interactive discussion, participants will increase awareness and comfort of this important developmental period.

Levels: Intermediate Level (Infant Family Specialist & Infant Mental Health Specialist), Advanced Level (Infant Mental Health Specialist & Infant Mental Health Mentor)
Format: Interactive, Case presentation, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Attachment, Separation, Trauma, Grief & Loss

A6 Better Together: Strengthening the effectiveness of an infant mental health intervention on a system of care in Western Australia

Hiram Fitzgerald, PhD, IMH-E® (IV),  Lynn Priddis, PhD, IMH-E® (IV), Rochelle Matacz, MA, IMH-E® (IV), Sara Bayes, PhD, Julia Ann Pooley, PhD, Caroline Barratt-Pugh, PhD, IMH-E® (IV), and Daniel F. Kiely, PhD

We analyzed a System of Care in relation to prenatal to age 4 infant mental health services (PIMH), using a systems-engagement approach.  Social Network Analysis reviewed key issues affecting the quality of system integration among five government funded agencies with respect infant mental health. Focus groups and interviews with consumers revealed key differences with agency perceptions regarding the quality of serves being provided.  Based on the SNA information, targeted IMH relationship-based training programs will be implemented as will continued SRA analyses in order to assess system change. We illustrate how collective impact approaches can transform IMH service delivery systems.

Levels: Introductory Level (Infant Family Associate & Infant Family Specialist)
Format: Research/Evaluation
Areas of competency: Research & Evaluation; Service Delivery Systems

A7 Overcoming the Effects of Birth Trauma on Mother-Infant Attachment

Melisa Schuster, MSW

Birth is a pivotal event in the life of a woman and can result in her feeling empowered or defeated and overwhelmed.  Up to 45% of women report having experienced a traumatic birth, and 6-9% of women develop PTSD after childbirth.  While symptoms of Postpartum Depression and PTSD as a result of birth trauma overlap, it is a distinct disorder with unique symptoms, including interfering with mother-baby bonding and attachment.  Through lecture and case presentation, IMH workers will be able to identify symptoms of traumatic birth and provide effective interventions.

 Levels: Intermediate Level (Infant Family Specialist & Infant Mental Health Specialist), Advanced Level (Infant Mental Health Specialist & Infant Mental Health Mentor)
Format: Case presentation
Areas of competency: Pregnancy & Early Parenthood; Attachment, Separation, Trauma, Grief & Loss 

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Monday, May 6, 2019 (B1 – B7)   • 11:00 am – 12:30 pm

B1 Playful Interventions to Facilitate Attachment

Stephanie Grant, LPC, PhD, IMH-E® (II), Julie McGowan, MSW, and Angie Cameruci, MSW, IMH-E® (II)

The purpose of this breakout session will be to provide information on the importance of play and examples of playful interventions that can be used in sessions to facilitate attachment between caregivers and their infants/young children. Research related to the importance of play will be presented. Examples of playful interventions will be given and attendees will be provided with opportunities to practice such interactions. The need to scaffold such interventions in a way that facilitates attachment rather than increases stress in child or caregiver will be discussed with examples on how to modify the interactions to best fit the presentation of the dyad given as well. This session is appropriate for practicing I-ECMH clinicians.

Levels: Intermediate Level (Infant Family Specialist & Infant Mental Health Specialist), Advanced Level (Infant Mental Health Specialist & Infant Mental Health Mentor)
Format: Interactive, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Infant/Young Child/Family Centered Practice; Attachment, Separation, Trauma, Grief & Loss

B2 Thriving Together: Findings from the Infant Mental Health-Home Visiting Evaluation

Katherine Rosenblum, PhD, IMH-E® (IV), Maria Muzik, MD, MS, Deborah Weatherston, PhD, IMH-E® (IV), Mary Ludtke, MA, and Betty Tableman, MA

The Infant Mental Health-Home Visiting (IMH-HV) evaluation studies represent a significant collaboration of eight universities making up the Michigan Collaborative for Infant Mental Health Research (MCIMHR), the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, community, and family partners.  Three studies have been undertaken, one currently ongoing, each designed to assess the impact of IMH-HV on key MiECHV benchmark domains. This workshop will provide a brief overview of the IMH-HV evidence-based model, the evidence-based fidelity tool, and up-to-date outcomes of studies. Presenters will discuss next steps in the evaluation process, including implications for legislative requirements and training.

Levels: Intermediate Level (Infant Family Specialist & Infant Mental Health Specialist), Advanced Level (Infant Mental Health Specialist & Infant Mental Health Mentor)
Format: Research/Evaluation, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Relationship-focused Therapeutic Practice; Research & Evaluation

B3 Using a Parts Perspective to Enhance Infant Mental Health Work

Susan Barrow, MSW, IMH-E® (III)

There are several current psychotherapy models taking the perspective that the self is best viewed through the lens of multiplicity.  Examining IMH work from a parts perspective gives us a new way of viewing some of the clinical challenges we face in working with adults, children, and the complex relationships between them.  This workshop will briefly highlight some of the components of contemporary models utilizing a parts perspective, and will then detail some potential uses of parts work in IMH cases.  Case examples will illustrate these uses, with the intention of providing clinicians currently working with families some ideas for applying these concepts to their own work.

Levels: Advanced Level (Infant Mental Health Specialist & Infant Mental Health Mentor)
Format: Case presentation, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Relationship-focused Therapeutic Practice; Attachment, Separation, Trauma, Grief & Loss

B4 Connections, Connections, Connections: A Panel of Circle of Security-Parenting Perspectives

Mark Rains, PhD and Brandi Stupica, PhD

Infant mental health is about  “Relationship, Relationship, Relationship,” but this idea can be vague for parents. Forming, maintaining, and repairing parent-child connections may be a more helpful concept. Circle of Security® Parenting™ (COS-P) guides parents in recognizing their 0-5 year-old child’s exploration and attachment behaviors and supporting their child’s needs for connection and comfort. This workshop will: (a) illustrate the 8-session COS-P group process and resources, (b) focus on its approach to reorganizing and mastering trauma history and parenting, (c) reference publicly available print and website resources, and (d) reflect on parallel process connections among child, parent, service providers, and mentors. 

Levels: Introductory Level (Infant Family Associate & Infant Family Specialist), Intermediate Level (Infant Family Specialist & Infant Mental Health Specialist)
Format: Interactive, Case presentation, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Attachment, Separation, Trauma, Grief & Loss

B5 Grounding Ourselves in Best Practice for Reflective Supervision

Faith Eidson, MSW, IMH-E® (IV) and Ashley McCormick, MSW, IMH-E® (IV)

We will begin by introducing and reviewing the newly revised version of the Best Practice Guidelines for Reflective Supervision/Consultation (BPGRSC).  The BPGRSC describe the knowledge, skills, and practices that are critical to reflective supervision/consultation (RS/C).  The second half of the presentation will focus on 3 distinct ways that RS/C may be provided, as defined in the BPGRSC: program supervision, group supervision, and virtual supervision.  Those 3 modalities will be discussed through the use of case examples, small group discussion and examination of common questions, barriers, and lessons learned.

 Levels: Intermediate Level  (Infant Family Specialist & Infant Mental Health Specialist)
Format: Interactive, Case presentation, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Reflective Supervision  

B6 The transformative power of the team approach, bringing the babies voice to the courtroom

Erin Werth, MSW, IMH-E® (III), Angela Bedz, MSW, IMH-E® (III), and Janet Evans, MSW, IMH-E® (III)

Genesee County baby court has spent the last 10 years bringing the voice of the Infant/toddler in foster care into the court room through the parallel process using a team approach. Participants will hear from baby court team members that represent Infant Mental Health, foster care, and the courts as they discuss how their connections to each other provided the secure base necessary to support and heal the parent/infant dyad within the foster care/court system.

Levels: All
Format: Case presentation, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Advocacy; Service Delivery Systems

B7 Moving Beyond Father Engagement; Ongoing work with fathers using a trauma informed approach

Amy Dorow, BSW, IMH-E® (II)

This presentation will focus on the difficult task we are faced with when working with male trauma survivors in families.  In the field of Infant Mental Health father engagement is a key component to our work with families.  Moving forward and leaning into the complex family structure requires that we begin to evaluate and consider the role that male trauma plays in the relationships between fathers and their families.  Ongoing work within families challenges us to do more than just “engage” fathers and male role models, but to help them tell their stories, hold a space for their pain and walk with them on the journey of healing.  We will discuss strategies to help fathers feel comfortable sharing their stories, we will identify barriers to successfully maintaining relationships with fathers who experienced trauma and discuss ideas for increasing the resources for fathers in our communities that focus on resilience and healing.  New and seasoned practitioners will benefit from learning new strategies for maintaining relationships with fathers, discussing intergenerational and interpersonal male trauma as well as sharing ideas for increasing and improving programs for fathers.

Levels: All
Format: Interactive, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Attachment, Separation, Trauma, Grief & Loss
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Monday, May 6, 2019 (C1 – C7)   •   2:30 pm – 4:00 pm 

C1 The Multicultural Process of Change: Creating Equitable Service Delivery Systems

Cassandra Joubert, ScD (Keynote Speaker)

This session will give participants practical tools for connecting with multicultural families and addressing inequities at multiple levels:  personal, interpersonal, institutional and cultural.

Levels: All
Format: Informative
Areas of competency: Cultural Competence; Advocacy

C2 Leveraging the Power of Reflective Supervision in Non-Traditional, Multidisciplinary Teams of Professionals Working with Young Children and Families: The Detroit Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program

Carolyn Dayton, MSW, PhD, IMH-E® (IV), Aimee Surma, MS, Janae Ashford, BA, Inger Blair, BA, and Ashley Zuverink, MSW

An overview of how the Detroit Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (CLPPP) is leveraging the power reflective supervision and integrating trauma informed care to provide client-centered services to Detroit families of children exposed to lead poisoning.  The multidisciplinary team, which includes nurses, social workers and community health workers, has incorporated monthly reflective supervision meetings to understand how lead poisoning is traumatic not only for the child, but also the parent/guardians and service providers.  At the state and national levels, increasing numbers of non-IMH-trained professionals are implementing home-based services to families with young children.  As these numbers increase, it is important that models of reflective supervision are adapted to meet the needs of these practitioners.  By providing a place and a space for professionals to process their work, the reflective supervision model can be adapted for use with a wide range of professionals providing services to vulnerable families of young children.

Levels: All
Format: Information sharing
Areas of competency: Relationship-focused Therapeutic Practice

C3 Toxic Stress, The Dyad, and The Role of The Home Based Therapist

Andrea Penick, MA and Ann Lintz, MSW, IMH-E® (III)

Home based therapy most often serves our communities’ high-risk, high-needs families. One of the greatest barriers to providing home-based therapy is understanding toxic stress and the impact on the parent-child dyad. How can the therapist utilize effective interventions when toxic stress permeates the environment? This workshop will follow one case study to look at the impact stress has had on the family, the dyad and the work of the home-based therapist.

Levels: Intermediate Level (Infant Family Specialist & Infant Mental Health Specialist)
Format: Interactive, Case presentation, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Attachment, Separation, Trauma, Grief & Loss; Direct Service Skills

C4 Infant Mental Health in Private Practice

Monica Laming, MSW, IMH-E® (II) and Tianna Rooney, PhD

In Michigan, the traditional mode of delivery for Infant Mental Health (IMH) services has primarily been in the home. This workshop will explore work of IMH practitioners in private practice with specific focus on how to transition and integrate IMH principles and values into a clinic setting. Discussion will include strategies and implications from IMH practitioners in private practice, illustrations from a case study, as well as lessons learned from the development of a specialized private practice program in Brighton, Michigan which is grounded in IMH principles.

Levels: All
Format: Case presentation, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Relationship-focused Therapeutic Practice; Service Delivery Systems

C5 Collaborative Connections: Supporting Parent-Child Relationships Through a Multidisciplinary Lens

Lindsey Biggs, MSW, IMH-E® (III), Melissa Youngblood, MS, Deborah Gershune, MS, and Lindsay Fanning, MSW, IMH-E® (III)

Presenters share their journey of the development of an innovative and reflective approach to early intervention programming in their agency. An IMH Clinician, Speech-Language Pathologist and/or Occupational Therapist build an alliance with each other, and caregivers, to support the overall developmental needs of young children within their home and community. Participants will be offered an opportunity to examine how reflective supervision sets the foundation for this process. A case presentation, led by an IMH Clinician, SLP, OT and IMH Program Supervisor, will highlight the successes and challenges of developing this unique service model. Presenters emphasize treating the whole child through acknowledgement of the importance of the parent-child relationship in children’s developmental success.

Levels: Introductory Level (Infant Family Associate & Infant Family Specialist), Intermediate Level (Infant Family Specialist & Infant Mental Health Specialist)
Format: Case presentation, Information Sharing
Areas of competency: Infant/Young Child/Family Centered Practice

C6 Fostering Connections: The importance of creating a holding space to provide effective Infant Mental Health work when partnering with the child welfare system

Danielle Davey, MSW, IMH-E® (II) and Kristyn Driver, MSW, IMH-E® (III)

Foster care is a complex system and often times at the center of the unique and sensitive needs families in the system face are traumatic and disrupted relationships. Therefore, it is particularly important as Infant Mental Health clinicians that we focus on the ways in which we think about, initiate and navigate the many different relationships and systems that are involved. This workshop will focus on the very beginning stages of our work with these families. How clinicians can set the tone for Infant Mental work while creating relationships and building strong connections with everyone that is involved on all levels in a way that cultivates a supportive environment that keeps the child(ren) and their best interests front and center.

 Levels: Introductory Level (Infant Family Associate & Infant Family Specialist), Intermediate Level (Infant Family Specialist & Infant Mental Health Specialist)
Format: Interactive, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Relationship-focused Therapeutic Practice

C7 Promoting Social Emotional Competence of Children and Educators

Jennifer Champagne, PhD, IMH-E® (II)

Working with young children is a highly rewarding and stressful occupation. We will explore how to strengthen the confidence and competence of early care and education professionals who face and address challenging behaviors in preschool settings. We will highlight five research-based practices that promote the social emotional competence of young children and how to nurture, strengthen, and support adults who educate and care for them.

 Levels: Introductory Level (Infant Family Associate & Infant Family Specialist), Intermediate Level (Infant Family Specialist & Infant Mental Health Specialist)
Format: Interactive, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Infant/Young Child Development & Behavior; Adult Learning Theory & Practice
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Tuesday, May 7, 2019 (D1 – D7)     •   11:15 am – 12:45 pm

D1 The Healing Power of the Clinician-Parent Relationship for Young Children (3 to 6 years) and their Families

Jennifer Farley, PhD and Fran Jozefowicz, MSN, IMH-E® (IV)

This workshop will highlight a Parent-Young Child Program (PYCP) that serves young children (3 to 6 years) and their families, and a recent study focused on the clinical relationship with PYCP parents and clinicians.  This study examined the tenants of the working alliance and the genuineness of the clinical relationship during the working stages of treatment over three different time points.  Clinical and program implications will be explored including how to advocate for a relationship-based approach across treatment programs and within larger systems of care.

Levels: Intermediate Level (Infant Family Specialist & Infant Mental Health Specialist), Advanced Level (Infant Mental Health Specialist & Infant Mental Health Mentor)
Format: Research/Evaluation, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Relationship-focused Therapeutic Practice; Research & Evaluation 

D2 Understanding the Impact of Retained Reflexes on Relationships and Development: A Guide for the Infant Mental Health Practitioner

Pamela Crljenica, MSW, IMH-E® (III)

The field of Infant Mental Health has long understood the critical importance of the infant-parent relationship to all learning and development. But, what if something is interfering with that relationship that the field has yet to recognize? What does it mean for development if a child’s or parent’s primitive reflexes, specifically Fear Paralysis and Moro, are still retained? And, how does this impact their ability to build a successful relationship? In this workshop, learn how to identify if these reflexes are retained and impacting attachment, and what you as an Infant Mental Health practitioner can do about it.

Levels: All
Format: Interactive, Case presentation, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Pregnancy and Early Parenthood; Infant/Young Child Development & Behavior

D3 Supporting Healthy Relationships From the Start: Bridging the Gap in Infant Mental Health Through Integrated Healthcare

Kelly Mainville, MS and Kristina Figaro, MSW, IMH-E® (III)

Often doctors and medical staff in OBGYN clinics are not able to consult with mental health professionals about the complex needs of their patients. Integrated Healthcare with an IMH lens has begun an innovative approach to women’s health care. This workshop will use resident physician video testimonials, case presentation, and open discussion to explain how the Integrated Infant Mental Health Model can bridge the gap and help shape the lens of doctors and medical staff; giving them a more extensive understanding of the mother- baby dyad and family functioning, as well as improving outcomes for parents, infants, and young children.

Levels: All
Format: Interactive, Case presentation, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Relationship-focused Therapeutic Practice

D4 Tracking Performance and Supporting Clinical Growth in Infant Mental Health Practitioners: Using a Community-University Partnership to Develop an IMH Home Visit Checklist

Carolyn Dayton, MSW, PhD, IMH-E® (IV), Andrea Rodgers, MA, IMH-E® (III), Rosalva Osorio, MSW, IMH-E® (III), Ann Stacks, PhD, IMH-E® (IV), Joanne Sobeck, PhD, and Elizabeth Agius, BA

This talk will describe the 3-year collaboration of Wayne State University and the Children’s Center in Detroit to develop a home visit checklist for infant mental health clinicians.  The measure was designed to track practitioner activities and to inform the development and focus of reflective supervision.  The iterative process of the community-university partnership that sought to develop this tool will be described in detail and the checklist that was implemented will be described.

Levels: All
Format: Research/Evaluation, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Research & Evaluation; Agency Policy

D5 Using the Early Relational Health Screen in Home Visiting and Primary Care to Promote Infant-Caregiver Relationships

Kate Rosenblum, PhD, IMH-E® (IV), Rena Menke, PhD, IMH-E® (III), Alyssa Okey, MSW, IMH-E® (III), Shannon Franz, MS, IMH-E® (II), and Cait Rominski, MSW

The Early Relational Health Screen (ERHS) is a video-based tool used to observe and score infant-caregiver interactions, including a video review component designed to be used as a clinical guide to support parental reflection. Clinicians can utilize domain scores derived from the tool to track relational progress over time and better inform treatment. The Zero to Thrive team at the University of Michigan uses the ERHS in clinical/research home visits as well as in primary care office visits. Attendees at this workshop will gain a deeper understanding of the ERHS as a clinical tool and participate in an in-vivo administration and scoring. All Endorsement levels welcome.

Levels: All
Format: Interactive, Case presentation, Research/Evaluation, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Relationship-focused Therapeutic Practice; Screening and Assessment

D6 Communication without Saying a Word

Karen Anthony, LPC, MA, IMH-E® (II)

Often times we aren’t aware that we are communicating without even saying a word.  This session will focus on uncovering behaviors that many may not even be aware that they are displaying.  Through the use of short exercises, preschool teachers and/or social emotional coaches will experience and explore how the nonverbal behaviors they display can impact another individual.  Participants will learn how proxemics, kinesics, haptics, and paraverbal communication impacts their relationships with the children and families they serve. 

Levels: Introductory Level (Infant Family Associate & Infant Family Specialist), Intermediate Level (Infant Family Specialist & Infant Mental Health Specialist),
Format: Interactive, Information sharing
Areas of Competency: Cultural Competence

D7 The Science and Art of Questions in Reflective Supervision 

Mary Claire Heffron, PhD, IMH-E® (IV) – Invited Speaker
Questions are an essential tool used by reflective supervisors to promote the capacity to think and feel  in a deeper and more attuned level. This workshop will focus on building expanded understanding of how to construct questions that help support supervisees and group participants to explore and learn from their experiences and the experiences of others in more profound ways. We will look at the deep structure and intent of questions, how our own observation and awareness and several different theoretical approaches can be used to shape choice of questions more intentionally.

Levels: Intermediate Level (Infant Family Specialist & Infant Mental Health Specialist), Advanced Level (Infant Mental Health Specialist & Infant Mental Health Mentor)
Format: Interactive, Case presentation, Research/Evaluation, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Adult Learning Theory & Practice; Group Process
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Tuesday, May 7, 2019 (E1 – E6)    •   2:15 pm – 3:45 pm

E1 Reflective Supervision:  The Co-Construction of a Relationship

Deborah Weatherston, PhD, IMH-E® (IV) (Keynote Speaker)

This workshop will explore the co-construction of a reflective supervision relationship through a live fishbowl demonstration.  The presenter will use the first part of the workshop to provide an overview of reflective supervision practices and principles. Then a real time live supervision session will occur with the presenter providing a reflective supervision space for another individual. Time will then be left at the end to process and discuss what was just observed, in a way to deepen and better understand the core principles in the co-construction of this relationship.

Levels: Intermediate Level (Infant Family Specialist & Infant Mental Health Specialist), Advanced Level (Infant Mental Health Specialist & Infant Mental Health Mentor)
Format: Interactive, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Reflective Supervision

E2 Connections in the Classroom: Supporting Social Emotional Development of Infants and Young Children Through Collaboration with Teachers and Caregivers

Melanie Foley, MSW, IMH-E® (III) and Catherine Rich, LPC, MA, IMH-E® (III)

All infants and young children learn within the context of relationships.  All relationships!  When providing comprehensive services to families, it is essential to support every aspect of an infant/young child’s life.  Many infants and young children spend time in childcare settings, thus, identifying the teacher/caregiver as a primary relationship in their life.  But what do we do when teachers/caregivers are overcome with barriers that prevent them from maintaining strong relationships with the infants/young children in their care?  The answer:  WE, as Infant Mental Health service providers, are a needed supportive relationship for the teachers/caregivers.  When they have a safe space to be reflective and self-aware, teachers and caregivers are better able to socially and emotionally support and meet the infants and young children in their classroom.

Levels: Introductory Level (Infant Family Associate & Infant Family Specialist), Intermediate Level (Infant Family Specialist & Infant Mental Health Specialist)
Format: Interactive, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Relationship-focused Therapeutic Practice

E3 Raising Community Voices to Support Infant Mental Health

Michele Corey, Kristyn Driver, MSW, IMH-E® (III), and Andrea Rodgers, MA, IMH-E® (III)

You want to see better things happen for families, and you are working hard to see that happen. Are you interested in being a part of bigger policy and program changes? Sometimes programs that are supposed to help families just don’t. Sometimes there just isn’t enough to go around, and good programs aren’t available to everyone who needs them. Sometimes programs aren’t designed to be able to reach the families who need them most. People making investment and program decisions need to hear from people who know what you know and who have experienced what you’ve experienced. No one knows better what could be done differently to make things better for families. Community leaders, service providers and families receiving infant mental health services are uniquely suited to identify barriers to their success and define potential solutions. Sharing this information in your own voice and encouraging the voices of those you serve is a powerful strategy for policy change. This session will help participants build their own advocacy skills and find opportunities to share their experiences with policymakers in ways that can change the trajectory for families everywhere.

 Levels: All
Format: Interactive
Areas of competency: Advocacy and Law; Regulation & Policy

E4 Dads Matter: Engaging and Supporting High Risk Fathers in a Community-Based Group Intervention

Maria Muzik, MD, MS, Danielle Nicholls, MSW, IMH-E® (III), Nicole Miller, MSW, Eric Donald, MA, Dalicia LeFlore, MSW, and Emmanuel Peters, BA

Fathers are essential to the well-being of children yet are under-represented in parent-child services. A community mental health program and university research group collaborated to enhance services for fathers. Researchers and community partners interviewed fathers to understand effective ways to engage and meet their parenting and other needs. The fathers’ suggestions for programming were incorporated into a comprehensive group model named Fraternity of Fathers.  This workshop will use discussion, video, and activities to illustrate the group model and outcomes, considerations for implementation in a community setting, and goals for building a supportive network of services for fathers.

Levels: Intermediate Level (Infant Family Specialist & Infant Mental Health Specialist)
Format: Interactive, Research/Evaluation
Areas of competency: Family Relationships & Dynamics

E5 You, Me, & The Space Between Us; A Workshop For Reflective Supervisors

Joni Zieldorff, MSW, IMH-E® (III) and Sheryl Goldberg, MSW, IMH-E® (IV)

One of the most important aspects of reflective supervision is the process of examining who you are as a reflective supervisor and who the supervisee is. This is critical to meet and strengthen the goals of reflective supervision. The stories of other current and past relationships exist for each of us and this workshop will identify specific ways for reflective supervisors to engage in their own self-reflection and to encourage development of this process in their supervisees.  This workshop will feature a live reflective supervision fishbowl with time after to discuss the reactions and feelings raised throughout the reflective supervision.

 Levels: Intermediate Level (Infant Family Specialist & Infant Mental Health Specialist), Advanced Level (Infant Mental Health Specialist & Infant Mental Health Mentor)
Format: Interactive, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Self Awareness; Curiosity

E6 Radical Relationships: Healing with Survivors of Oppression

Phyllis Shelman, MSW, Amy Delira, MSW, IMH-E® (III), and Hannah Schottenfels, MSW, IMH-E® (III)

We believe early interventionists are in a unique position to form radical relationships that lead to healing.This workshop looks to inform attendees on their role as healers with families who have experienced systematic oppression. Facilitators will discuss how systematic oppression and trauma impacts the parent-infant attachment relationship. Facilitators will guide participants through introspection focused on uncovering bias and transforming beliefs/attitudes towards families surviving oppression. Facilitators will provide a space to reflect on intersectionality, historical trauma, interconnectedness, caregiving, protection, and survival.

Levels: All
Format: Interactive, Case presentation, Information sharing
Areas of competency: Relationship-focused Therapeutic Practice; Attachment, Separation, Trauma, Grief & Loss

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